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Self-Knowledge and Spiritual Yearning by E. Douglass Brown Book Blast – Win a $25 Gift Card

122840_book blast


Self KnowledgeTitle: 
Self-Knowledge and Spiritual Yearning
Author: E. Douglass Brown, Ph.D
Publisher: iUniverse
Genre: Psychology
Format: Ebook/Hardcover/Paperback

According to E. Douglass Brown, modern science has silenced all doubt among open-minded informed people that life emanates from an intelligent designer. The all-encompassing, distinct characteristic of the human being is an inborn link to the spirit of God. To cultivate that link, the Creator provides human beings with a divine paradigm for self-development.

In Self-Knowledge and Spiritual Yearning: The Role of Spirituality in Psychological Health, Dr. Brown offers revitalizing prescriptions from the Quran for cultivating a healthy personality and for healing the person who has suffered psychospiritual injury and rupture from his or her true self. Dr. Brown also describes seven stages of psychospiritual self-development identified centuries ago by Islamic scholars and mystics, and provides examples of behavior in each stage.

Through the use of universal metaphors, Dr. Brown explains how a person advances to higher levels of self-awareness, finally culminating in unfettered God-consciousness. He also includes instructions from the Quran about how to overcome life situations that impede your progress in achieving a greater plane of consciousness. Learn to focus on spiritual healing and start integrating it into your daily life!


Self-Knowledge and Spiritual Yearning is available for order at




E. Douglass Brown holds a BS in Psychology and Philosophy from St. Louis University, an MA in Social Psychology from the University of Iowa, and a PhD in Psychology from St. Louis University. A former Associate Professor of Psychology and licensed Clinical Psychologist for twenty-nine years, Dr. Brown has worked with patient populations in varied settings. 


E. Douglass is giving away a $25 Gift Card!


Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive one $25 Gift Certificate to the e-retailer of your choice
  • This giveaway begins November 30 and ends on December 11.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on December 12.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!


a Rafflecopter giveaway

“Nowadays, electronic media rule” – Florence Byham Weinberg, author of DOLET

As a university professor for 36 years, I was expected to publish, so I wrote four scholarly books and many articles and reviews. The first scholarly book, my doctoral dissertation, came out in 1972. Writing fiction began in earnest in 1998 as I prepared for retirement (in 1999). I completed the first novel in 2000 and have written 10 mainly historical novels and historical mysteries. One exception, published in 2014, is Anselm: a Metamorphoses, roughly classified as a metaphysical fantasy. The present novel returns to my scholarly specialization, the French Renaissance.

My early efforts at writing fiction were still tinged with scholarly turns of phrase. I engaged an editor, Gerald W. Mills, a talented editor who taught creative writing and who took me in hand. He edited three of my early books and guided my writing style into the twenty-first century. However, I had a rude awakening when I tried to place my early efforts with an agent or a publisher. I was rejected 243 times by agents. My historical novel about the 16th-century figure, Louise Labé—both poet and knight in armor—was published in French in Lyon, France, before any books in English came out. I was accepted by Twilight Times Books without the benefit of an agent thanks to Gerald Mills, who represented one of my books, The Storks of La Caridad, to them, along with one of his own books. We were both accepted, and I have stayed loyal to that publisher ever since.

Like most authors, I suspect, marketing is the most difficult aspect of writing. Naturally, we all passionately hope that readers will find us, read us, and become fans. I am best at personal appearances where I lecture, answer questions, and then sell books. I do have a website, am on Facebook, LinkedIn, Goodreads, and other on-line book sites.  Still, personal contact works best for me. I also find that having an open house to present a new book works well, also if the book has a special aspect, such as incorporating native wild foods that a missionary eats or prepares, or a musical emphasis where the hero meets the teen-age Beethoven. Then, the book will sell well at conferences or meetings featuring organic foods and gardening, or after a concert in a local church. I have had fair but limited luck with signings in book stores. I organized my own book tour for the first mystery I wrote and had everything from an empty room to an enthusiastic crowd that subsequently became a fan club. Nowadays, electronic media rule, and we all have to accept that with grace, adjust to it and use it to our advantage.


Title: Dolet

Genre: Nonfiction Novel; Historical Fiction

Author: Florence Byham Weinberg

Publisher: Twilight Times Books

Read Chapter One

Amazon / OmniLit / Twilight Times Books

About the Book:

Dolet depicts the life and times of Etienne Dolet. Etienne, who told the bald truth to friend and foe alike, angered the city authorities in sixteenth-century Toulouse, fled to Lyon, and became a publisher of innovative works on language, history, and theology. His foes framed him; he was persecuted, imprisoned, and ultimately executed by the Inquisition for daring to publish the Bible in French translation.

What readers are saying:

“[Dolet]  …I read it all with pleasure, and delighted to see names that I have known for some time coming alive as “characters,” albeit fictitious ones. I especially liked the way in which you brought out the sense of community, of being a band of brothers that so many of those amazing people shared.”
~ Kenneth Lloyd-Jones, Professor, Trinity College, Hartford, CT


About the Author:

Florence Byham Weinberg, born in Alamogordo, New Mexico, lived on a ranch, on a farm, and traveled with her military family. After earning a PhD, she taught for 36 years in three universities. She published four scholarly books. Since retiring, she has written seven historical novels and one philosophical fantasy/thriller. She lives in San Antonio, loves cats, dogs and horses, and great-souled friends with good conversation. Visit her website and connect with her on Facebook.

Guest post: The Story Behind ‘The Cavalier Spy,’ by S.W. O’Connell

TheCavalierSpy_medIn many ways, The Cavalier Spy should have been an easy book to write. After all, it is the sequel to the first book in the Yankee Doodle Spies series, The Patriot Spy, so many of the characters, themes and settings were in place when I began the book. But ironically, that made the book all the more difficult. Why? Because I wanted The Cavalier Spy to stand on its own. I wanted readers who had not read the first book in the series to enjoyThe Cavalier Spy as much as those who did read The Patriot Spy. I had no idea how hard that would be. And starting out, I had no idea how I would do it. But then I began to write and the story took over, as it often does.

The story has three general settings. I think that helped. In fact, the settings are essential to the building of the tale. This is, after all, a historical novel and I am trying to portray history through fiction. And history is about places, as well as people. The first setting is New York. The second is the area around the Hackensack Valley of New Jersey. The third setting is “western Jersey,” the area along the Delaware River. During the time of the American Revolution New Jersey was often referred to as “the Jerseys.” The Jerseys were east and west Jersey. East Jersey is that part of the state that borders New York and the North (Hudson) River. West Jersey is the portion that borders Philadelphia and the Delaware River.

Since the first setting was the same as that of The Patriot Spy, and as I began to draw out the plot, I used the setting to refer back to events that unfolded in it. I did not plan this. It just came to me as I wrote. An example is when the protagonist, Jeremiah Creed and his men are sent behind British lines he decides to go by the post house in Yorkville. There he “re-recruits” young Thomas Jefferies to the cause. I use those scenes to flash back to how they originally met, and the events that drew them together. As Creed drives deeper into British occupied New York, people he encounters and venues provide opportunities to briefly let the reader in on what happened in book one. Another challenge for the writer is to do this without making things tedious for those who read the first book. The trick is to keep the flashback short. Usually a couple of sentences. The trick is to do this without tying up the story too much and break the flow. As the story progresses to the other two settings, the need and opportunity to do this fades away. Soon the story is standing on its own legs and the reader is caught up on what happened.

Another interesting challenge I faced was telling the tale of how my protagonist arrived in America. In The Patriot Spy I hinted that he was an immigrant. InThe Cavalier Spy, I show it. But how to get there without distracting too much from the main plot, Washington’s desperate attempt to avoid defeat and his use of intelligence to aid those efforts. The idea came to me suddenly. I would have Washington and his fictional “Senior Intelligence Advisor” conduct what is essentially a “subject interview” of Creed. They confront him on his mysterious past and want to “vet” him. He decides to tell all in a “confession” to his commander in chief. Don’t worry. He doesn’t really tell all. Some things have to be saved for future books. But we do get a several chapter flashback out of it. And I had a lot of fun writing it.

By time I got to the Hackensack Valley setting, I was thoroughly enjoying myself. I was able to create a fictional village and spin some interesting characters in and out of it. But in doing it, I reveal an interesting and little noted fact about the American war for Independence. It was a complex struggle and a local one. New Jersey raised some impressive Loyalist troops for the King and one of those regiments plays a role. The Hackensack Valley had a significant Dutch populace. After all, East Jersey was part of the Dutch colony (along with New York) of New Amsterdam. This provided me some rich characters to develop. It is in this setting that I bring the strange case of “Mister X” into the story. Weaving a controversial historic figure into the plot was intriguing to me, the writer. I hope it is for the reader as well.

The last setting is West Jersey. This is the iconic “times that try men’s souls.” The new nation’s hopes are all but dashed. Washington escapes the British but is now ignominiously holed up on the far bank of the Delaware River and his army has evaporated. To have any hope of saving his army and the cause, Washington must send Jeremiah Creed back into the bosom of the enemy. A key ingredient, almost a character, in this setting is, believe it or not, Mother Nature. A cold winter is gripping the Delaware Valley and it has a role in everything. The characters (and their horses) are affected. The Continental Army is affected. And most importantly, the British Army is affected. The despair that unfolds in the first two settings culminates in desperation. And this desperation sets in on both the fictional and historical characters. Washington is desperate to save his Army and the Revolution. Creed is desperate to do his duty. And the British are desperate not to lose what they have achieved. But desperation breeds valor and resourcefulness. But it can also breed mistakes. And ultimately, the fortunes of men and of nations, can turn on mistakes.



S.W. O’Connell is the author of the Yankee Doodle Spies series of action and espionage novels set during the American Revolutionary War. The author is a retired Army officer with over twenty years of experience in a variety of intelligence-related assignments around the world. He is long time student of history and lover of the historical novel genre. So it was no surprise that he turned to that genre when he decided to write back in 2009. He lives in Virginia.


Title: The Cavalier Spy

Genre: Historical

Author: S. W. O’Connell


Publisher: Twilight Times Books

Purchase link:

Amazon / OmniLit 

About the Book:

1776: His army clinging to New York by a thread, a desperate General George Washington sends Lieutenant Jeremiah Creed behind British lines once more. But even the audacity of Creed and his band of spies cannot stop the British juggernaut from driving the Americans from New York, and chasing them across New Jersey in a blitzkrieg fashion. Realizing the imminent loss of one of the new nation’s most important states to the enemy, Washington sends Creed into the war-torn Hackensack Valley. His mission: recruit and train a gang of rogues to work behind British lines.

However, his mission takes a strange twist when the British high command plots to kidnap a senior American officer and a mysterious young woman comes between Creed and his plans. The British drive Washington’s army across the Delaware. The new nation faces its darkest moment. But Washington plans a surprise return led by young Creed, who must strike into hostile land so that Washington can rally his army for an audacious gamble that could win, or lose, the war.

“More than a great spy story… it is about leadership and courage in the face of adversity…The Cavalier Spy is the story of America’s first army and the few… those officers and soldiers who gave their all to a cause that was seemingly lost…”

~ Les Brownlee, former Acting Secretary of the Army and retired Army Colonel

“Secret meetings, skirmishes and scorching battles… The Cavalier Spy takes the reader through America’s darkest times and greatest triumphs thanks to its powerful array of fictional and historical characters… this book shows that courage, leadership and audacity are the key elements in war…”

~ F. William Smullen, Director of National Security Studies at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School and Author of Ways and Means for Managing UP